Review of Oh.’s “Metallia” by Jos Driessen of Progwereld
by on August 31, 2018 in Metallia Reviews

From the Dutch progressive/symphonic rock website, Progwereld, reviewer Jos Driessen gives ‘Metallia’ a splendid review.

Jos Driessen, is not only a lover of language (a writer and former musician) but also of progressive music such as Pink Floyd, Yes, Genesis, Camel, Tangerine Dream, King Crimson.

These two passages are most delightfully descriptive

What Oh. screams out of her guitar is not for the faint-hearted, by the constant stream of trash riffs this is a dirty Steve Vai or a vicious Joe Satriani but with balls or better said without balls or at least as well. It is unsettling in the metal scene when a longhaired guitarist turns out to be a woman in the end.

Her voice meanders from mood to emotion. From fear to love. The songs do not have a standard structure but are textures like the wandering Etesian winds that so often thrash the Aegean Sea.

From Google Translate and DeepL translator

“Finally, an album title with a name that covers it all and where we don’t have to explain in which genre we should place it again. Only here no men with too long hair and too much testosterone, but a frail Greek beauty that plays all instruments, including a Toumperleki.

The only female guitarist who comes to mind shaking the rock-hard metal riffs and Bach loops out of her fragile sleeve, is the Frenchwoman Tina S. She skillfully plays Ludwig von Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata, a classical piano song in a rock-hard but also super fast metal jacket. More women’s names that approach the Oh game I can’t further recount 1-2-3.

However, The Oh.Racle as Oh also calls herself on this CD plays differently than Tina S and can do much more. Oh of course stands for her initials, only Olivia is not a name that you associate with dirty metal and the name Hadjiioannou is not exactly a fit in this circuit. You want a heartfelt “bless you”, to happen to you anyway.

What Oh. screams out of her guitar is not for the faint-hearted, by the constant stream of trash riffs this is a dirty Steve Vai or a vicious Joe Satriani but with balls or better said without balls or at least as well. It is unsettling in the metal scene when a longhaired guitarist turns out to be a woman in the end.

In 25 minutes, she not only exposes herself literally, but she lets one see and hear that her avant-garde metal is an injection of eclectic languish and compassion. An atmosphere where the Greek Sirtaki is a very short dance and the plates are thrown on the ground as quickly as possible to run away from all this calamity. The Greek crisis, translated into a metal box, concealing a Greek drama in six parts. She explains the meaning of the texts behind the songs on YouTube herself. We recommend it before starting this dark album.

But can she do more, Oh? I’m hearing you think? Yes, the groovy bass lines are luscious, the keys are ominously laid out and her vocals are one of more atmospheric impressions than melody lines follow. But always a sound of hope. Her voice meanders from mood to emotion. From fear to love. The songs do not have a standard structure but are textures like the wandering Etesian winds that so often thrash the Aegean Sea.

Despite the ferocious guitar music, the cacophony remains bright thanks to her drumming on the electric pads which support the music perfectly. Her music thrives in chaos. Bee is the only song to which I could refer to the end of A Tower Struck Down by Steve Hackett, partly because of the many tapping techniques. The rest is mash-up of a lot of heavy metal guitar.

The Oh.Racle is versatile and wonderfully idiosyncratic, ideal to let the view of infinite metal slide over you. I am curious to see how she will develop further.”

Jos Driessen ~ Progwereld

For the Scrapbook

Progwereld - Oh. Metallia - Review

From 2001, Progwereld is a premier website that provides information about bands and record labels, reviews CDs and concerts for the Dutch crowd. “They are oriented towards quality and thoroughness than towards quantity and speed, as believe that quantity should never come at the expense of quality.”

Visit Progwereld to read the review in Dutch here.

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